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COVID-19 Underscored Importance Of Investing In Public Health: WHO Chief Scientist

Addressing the 15th JRD Tata Memorial Oration from Geneva, WHO chief scientist Soumya Swaminathan highlighted the impact of COVID-19 on education, violence against women, reproductive health and services

COVID-19 Underscored Importance Of Investing In Public Health: WHO Chief Scientist
Highlights
  • COVID highlighted importance of investing in public health: Dr Swaminathan
  • COVID-19 vaccines will be available by early 2021: Dr Swaminathan
  • Pandemic taught importance of collaboration and solidarity: Dr Swaminathan

New Delhi: The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the importance of investing in public health and primary healthcare, WHO chief scientist Soumya Swaminathan said, noting that at least a couple of coronavirus vaccines could be available by early next year. Addressing the 15th JRD Tata Memorial Oration from Geneva, Dr Swaminathan highlighted the impact of COVID-19 on education, violence against women, reproductive health and services.

Also Read: COVID Warrior: A Doctor In Emergency Department Of A Mumbai Hospital Explains How Fighting COVID-19 Is Mentally And Physically Draining

Of the lessons that I have learned over the last nine or ten months, the most important one is the importance of investing in public health and primary healthcare, she said. We see examples of countries where investments in primary healthcare over the past decade or two have paid off. On the contrary, you have high income countries where they’ve been overwhelmed and haven’t been able to put in place some of the mechanisms that have been needed, she said.

Dr Swaminathan said immunisation for the novel coronavirus may be available by early next year.

We are working on vaccines, which hopefully by the early part of 2021 we will have at least a couple of vaccines that have been proven to be safe and effective and that we can then start using in the most vulnerable and high-risk populations, she added.

Emphasising on the differential impact of the pandemic on women and children, Dr Swaminathan identified some key factors to address the gendered impact that included social services for women employed in the informal sector, the importance of sex and age disaggregated data and universal health coverage schemes such as Ayushman Bharat.

Also Read: Top Doctors Back Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s COVID-19 Caution Amid Festive Season

On the biggest learnings from the COVID-19, Dr Swaminathan said the pandemic taught the importance of global collaboration and solidarity, political will and leadership and community engagement and empowerment.

On the impact of COVID-19 on maternal and child mortality in low and middle-income countries, she said the estimated coverage of essential mother and child health interventions reduced by 10-52 per cent and the prevalence of wasting increased by 10-50 per cent.

Population Foundation of India’s Executive Director, Poonam Muttreja, said, This year’s oration is a special time for us It is our 50th anniversary. JRD Tata is among our key founders. We strongly believe that if our founding fathers were here today, they would be proud to see the difference the Population Foundation of India has made to the lives of millions of people, particularly girls and women.

(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.) 

NDTV – Dettol Banega Swasth India campaign is an extension of the five-year-old Banega Swachh India initiative helmed by Campaign Ambassador Amitabh Bachchan. It aims to spread awareness about critical health issues facing the country. In wake of the current COVID-19 pandemic, the need for WASH (WaterSanitation and Hygiene) is reaffirmed as handwashing is one of the ways to prevent Coronavirus infection and other diseases. The campaign highlights the importance of nutrition and healthcare for women and children to prevent maternal and child mortality, fight malnutrition, stunting, wasting, anaemia and disease prevention through vaccines. Importance of programmes like Public Distribution System (PDS), Mid-day Meal Scheme, POSHAN Abhiyan and the role of Aganwadis and ASHA workers are also covered. Only a Swachh or clean India where toilets are used and open defecation free (ODF) status achieved as part of the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan launched by Prime Minister Narendra Modi in 2014, can eradicate diseases like diahorrea and become a Swasth or healthy India. The campaign will continue to cover issues like air pollutionwaste managementplastic banmanual scavenging and sanitation workers and menstrual hygiene

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