Plastic Crisis: Big Brands Pledge To Turn Tide On Global Plastic Waste

Plastic Crisis: Big Brands Pledge To Turn Tide On Global Plastic Waste

250 organisations including many of the world's biggest packaging producers, leading consumer brands, retailers and recyclers, as well as governments and NGOs have pledged to eliminate single-use and unnecessary plastic and to innovate so that all packaging could be recycled, with targets to be reviewed regularly
News, Plastic Waste
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Plastic Crisis: Big Brands Pledge To Turn Tide On Global Plastic WasteA week ago the European Parliament also voted for a complete ban on single-use plastic items, including straws and cutlery, in a bid to curb pollution

London: Big brands, from Coke to Kellogg, pledged on Monday to cut all plastic waste from their operations in what the United Nations called the most ambitious effort yet to fight plastic pollution. The initiative comes as public pressure mounts on manufacturers and retailers to pare back the deluge of plastic packaging that is clogging landfills and choking the seas. “We know that cleaning up plastics from our beaches and oceans is vital, but this does not stop the tide of plastic entering the oceans each year. We need to move upstream to the source of the flow,” said Ellen MacArthur, the record-breaking British sailor who is behind the plastic initiative.

Also Read: In A Historic Step, European Parliament To Ban 10 Single-Use Plastics By 2021

The pledge by 250 organisations included many of the world’s biggest packaging producers, leading consumer brands, retailers and recyclers, as well as governments and NGOs. The Ellen MacArthur Foundation launched its New Plastics Economy Global Commitment to collaboration with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). Signatories promised to eliminate single-use and unnecessary plastic and to innovate so that all packaging could be recycled, with targets to be reviewed regularly and updates posted on their progress to drive momentum, the Foundation said.

Also Read: Floating Pipe To Start Collecting Plastic In Pacific Ocean

UNEP has estimated that if current pollution rates continue, there will be more plastic in the sea than fish by 2050, as 8 million tonnes of bottles and waste swamp the oceans each year, killing marine life and entering the food chain.

Most efforts ’til now have been focused on cleaning up plastic pollution. This commitment is about eliminating pollution at its source, Rob Opsomer, who leads the foundation’s New Plastics Economy initiative, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Erik Solheim, executive director of UNEP, described the commitment as “the most ambitious set of targets we have seen yet in the fight to beat plastics pollution.” Last week, the European Parliament voted for a complete ban on single-use plastic items, including straws and cutlery, in a bid to curb pollution. Three of the brands that signed up, Coca-Cola, PepsiCo and Nestle, were recently named the world’s worst plastic polluters, according to an index by the Break Free From Plastic movement.

Also Read: National Marine Litter Policy: Government Begins Work On An Action Plan To Check Plastic Waste Flowing Into Oceans

In North America, these three brands accounted for 64 per cent of all plastic pollution identified in cleanups, according to the analysis. “We are focused on improving the sustainability of all of our packaging, regardless of the type, and increasing the amount of recycled and renewable material,” Ben Jordan, senior director of environmental policy at Coca-Cola, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. PepsiCo said it had made a number of pledges in a bid to “build a PepsiCo where plastics need never become waste”. “Protecting our planet is hugely important to us. We are committed to achieving 100 per cent recyclable, compostable or biodegradable packaging by 2025,” PepsiCo spokesman Gian-Carlo Peressutti told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

NDTV – Dettol Banega Swachh India campaign lends support to the Government of India’s Swachh Bharat Mission (SBM). Helmed by Campaign Ambassador Amitabh Bachchan, the campaign aims to spread awareness about hygiene and sanitation, the importance of building toilets and making India open defecation free (ODF) by October 2019, a target set by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, when he launched Swachh Bharat Abhiyan in 2014. Over the years, the campaign has widened its scope to cover issues like air pollutionwaste managementplastic banmanual scavenging and menstrual hygiene. The campaign has also focused extensively on marine pollutionclean Ganga Project and rejuvenation of Yamuna, two of India’s major river bodies.

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