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What Is Being Done To Distribute COVID-19 Vaccines Globally?

As of mid-August, COVAX has distributed about 207 million doses to 138 countries and territories

What Is Being Done To Distribute COVID-19 Vaccines Globally?
Highlights
  • COVAX was created last year to try and ensure vaccines are distributed fair
  • COVAX is led by public health agencies including World Health Organization
  • COVAX is relying on donated shots from wealthy countries

London: What is being done to distribute COVID-19 vaccines globally? Several groups are working to get shots to poor countries, but they’re falling far short of what’s needed to curb outbreaks around the world. Among the efforts is COVAX, which relies on donations from rich countries and private funders. The group has missed its own distribution targets largely because it didn’t have the resources to secure vaccine supplies early on in the pandemic.

As of mid-August, COVAX has distributed about 207 million doses to 138 countries and territories. That’s compared with more than 417 million doses distributed in just the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

COVAX was created last year to try and ensure vaccines are distributed fairly and is led by public health agencies including the World Health Organization.

Also Read: What Have We Learnt From The Second Wave Of COVID-19 To Help Us Mitigate The Third Wave?

Without enough purchased vaccines, COVAX is now relying on donated shots from wealthy countries, but most of the pledged doses won’t be delivered this year. Logistics are another problem. To get vaccines from COVAX, countries have to show how they’ll distribute the shots and prioritize high-risk people like health workers and the elderly.

But some countries that are in desperate need of vaccines haven’t been able to show they can carry out such plans and lack the funds to carry out immunization campaigns. Other groups have been stepping in to help.

In July, the African Union said it bought 400 million doses of the Johnson & Johnson shot for 45 African countries. China, Russia and the U.S. have donated millions of vaccines to countries.

And in June, the leading industrial nations known as the Group of Seven said they would donate 1 billion doses to poor countries. The G-7 countries are Britain, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United States. Still, that’s far short of the 11 billion doses WHO says are needed to stop the pandemic.

Also Read: How Has COVID-19 Impacted Children? Experts Discuss At The Townhall

To protect people at high risk for severe illness in poor countries, WHO has urged rich countries to immediately donate more doses and to stop plans for immunizing children and giving booster doses. We are making conscious choices right now not to protect those in need, said WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

NDTV – Dettol Banega Swasth India campaign is an extension of the five-year-old Banega Swachh India initiative helmed by Campaign Ambassador Amitabh Bachchan. It aims to spread awareness about critical health issues facing the country. In wake of the current COVID-19 pandemic, the need for WASH (WaterSanitation and Hygiene) is reaffirmed as handwashing is one of the ways to prevent Coronavirus infection and other diseases. The campaign highlights the importance of nutrition and healthcare for women and children to prevent maternal and child mortality, fight malnutrition, stunting, wasting, anaemia and disease prevention through vaccines. Importance of programmes like Public Distribution System (PDS), Mid-day Meal Scheme, POSHAN Abhiyan and the role of Aganwadis and ASHA workers are also covered. Only a Swachh or clean India where toilets are used and open defecation free (ODF) status achieved as part of the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan launched by Prime Minister Narendra Modi in 2014, can eradicate diseases like diahorrea and become a Swasth or healthy India. The campaign will continue to cover issues like air pollutionwaste managementplastic banmanual scavenging and sanitation workers and menstrual hygiene

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