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Did You Know Dietary Restraint Reduces The Effects Of Genetic Risk Of Obesity? Study Finds

Research from the University of Exeter, Exeter Clinical Research Facility has discovered that those with a higher genetic risk of obesity can reduce the effects transmitted through hunger and uncontrolled eating by up to half by exercising restraint

Did You Know Dietary Restraint Reduces The Effects Of Genetic Risk Of Obesity? Study Finds
Genes linked to obesity increase BMI, with up to a quarter of this effect explained by increases in hunger and uncontrolled (including emotional) eating.

England: Obesity risk genes cause people to feel hungrier and lose control of their eating, although practising dietary constraints may help to reverse this, according to new research. Research from the University of Exeter, Exeter Clinical Research Facility, and the University of Bristol, funded by the Medical Research Council Doctoral Training Partnership and published in the International Journal of Epidemiology has discovered that those with a higher genetic risk of obesity can reduce the effects transmitted through hunger and uncontrolled eating by up to half by exercising restraint.

Also Read: Mother’s Consumption Of Ultra-Processed Foods Linked To Risk Of Obesity In Children: Study

The paper is entitled “Mediation and moderation of genetic risk to obesity through eating behaviours in two UK cohorts” and is published in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

Psychology PhD student, Shahina Begum, from the University of Exeter is lead author and said,

At a time when high-calorie foods are aggressively marketed to us, it’s more important than ever to understand how genes influence BMI. We already know that these genes impact traits and behaviours such as hunger and emotional eating, but what makes this study different is that we tested the influence of two types of dietary restraint — rigid and flexible — on the effect of these behaviours. What we discovered for the first time was that increasing both types of restraint could potentially improve BMI in people genetically at risk; meaning that restraint-based interventions could be useful to target the problem.

Genes linked to obesity increase BMI, with up to a quarter of this effect explained by increases in hunger and uncontrolled (including emotional) eating. There are over 900 genes that have so far been identified by researchers as being associated with BMI and several studies suggest these risk genes influence feelings of hunger and loss of control towards food.

Also Read:The Obesity Challenge And How To Combat It With Diet

This study examined 3,780 adults aged between 22 and 92 years old from two UK cohorts: the Genetics of Appetite Study, and Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Their weight and height were measured, and they provided a DNA sample via their blood to calculate an overall score for their genetic risk of obesity. They then completed questionnaires to measure 13 different eating behaviours, including disinhibition (a tendency to engage in binge or emotional eating) and over-eating due to hunger.

As expected, researchers found that a higher genetic risk score was associated with a higher BMI, partly due to increased disinhibition and hunger. However, results also found that those who had high levels of dietary restraint reduced those effects by almost half for disinhibition and a third for hunger — suggesting that restraint may counteract some of the effects of genetic risk.

There are different types of dietary restraint, including flexible strategies — such as being conscious about what you eat and deliberately taking small servings — to rigid strategies, like calorie counting. The study tested the influence of both types of restraint for the first time and found both could potentially improve BMI in people genetically at risk.

Also Read:Health Of Our Environment Interlinked With The Health Of Humans, Especially Mothers: Dia Mirza

(This story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

NDTV – Dettol have been working towards a clean and healthy India since 2014 via the Banega Swachh India initiative, which is helmed by Campaign Ambassador Amitabh Bachchan. The campaign aims to highlight the inter-dependency of humans and the environment, and of humans on one another with the focus on One Health, One Planet, One Future – Leaving No One Behind. It stresses on the need to take care of, and consider, everyone’s health in India – especially vulnerable communities – the LGBTQ populationindigenous people, India’s different tribes, ethnic and linguistic minorities, people with disabilities, migrants, geographically remote populations, gender and sexual minorities. In wake of the current COVID-19 pandemic, the need for WASH (WaterSanitation and Hygiene) is reaffirmed as handwashing is one of the ways to prevent Coronavirus infection and other diseases. The campaign will continue to raise awareness on the same along with focussing on the importance of nutrition and healthcare for women and children, fight malnutrition, mental wellbeing, self care, science and health, adolescent health & gender awareness. Along with the health of people, the campaign has realised the need to also take care of the health of the eco-system. Our environment is fragile due to human activity, which is not only over-exploiting available resources, but also generating immense pollution as a result of using and extracting those resources. The imbalance has also led to immense biodiversity loss that has caused one of the biggest threats to human survival – climate change. It has now been described as a “code red for humanity.” The campaign will continue to cover issues like air pollutionwaste managementplastic banmanual scavenging and sanitation workers and menstrual hygiene. Banega Swasth India will also be taking forward the dream of Swasth Bharat, the campaign feels that only a Swachh or clean India where toilets are used and open defecation free (ODF) status achieved as part of the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan launched by Prime Minister Narendra Modi in 2014, can eradicate diseases like diahorrea and the country can become a Swasth or healthy India.

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