50 Per Cent Indians May Be Hoarding E-Waste For Up To Five Years, Reveals A Survey

50 Per Cent Indians May Be Hoarding E-Waste For Up To Five Years, Reveals A Survey

The study done by Cerebra Green and Manufacturers Associations of Information and Technology revealed that another 30 per cent of Indians kept 3-4 articles whereas 20 per cent hoarded five or more unused e-waste devices for several years, thereby increasing the possibility of their incorrect disposal
E-Waste, Maharashtra, News
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50 Per Cent Indians May Be Hoarding E-Waste For Up To Five Years, Reveals A SurveyThe study reveals that even though people are aware of e-waste problem, they are hardly using right methods of disposing

Mumbai: As many as 50 per cent Indians may be hoarding at least two unused electrical or electronic devices constituting hazardous e-waste for up to five years, a survey has revealed. The survey, conducted by Cerebra Green and Manufacturers Associations of Information and Technology (MAIT), said that another 30 per cent kept 3-4 articles whereas 20 per cent hoarded five or more unused e-waste devices for several years, thereby increasing the possibility of their incorrect disposal. However, eight out of 10 Indians are aware of e-waste and the importance of special measures to dispose off it properly, but they do not use the right methods owing to lack of proper avenues for disposal, said Cerebra Integrated Technologies Managing Director V. Ranganathan.

Also Read: Combating The E-Waste Menace: How Waste Pickers In Pune Prevented 1,000 Kilos Of Waste From Going To The Landfill

Around 68 per cent participants in the survey said that they did not consider local waste collectors as a viable option to dispose e-waste, a view which was supported by the waste collectors themselves as 72 per cent of them don’t collect e-waste in their areas. “This forces 90 per cent of the people to dispose their e-waste either through local electronics vendors or online exchanges,” Mr. Ranganathan said.

Also Read: From Old To Gold: Tap Your Creative Side To Upcycle Your Used CDs

Presently, he said, India’s e-waste output is estimated to touch a staggering three million tonnes by December 2018, which would need effective, safe and environment-friendly disposal. While industries generate 70 per cent of the e-waste, households contribute 15 per cent and the rest comprises discarded ‘end of life’ electrical and electronic equipment (EEEs).
Cerebra Green has now tied up with Manufacturers Associations of Information and Technology (MAIT), Ministry of Electronics and IT and the Ministry of Environment to launch an ‘India Cleanup Week’ (October 13-19), which could be the biggest initiative of its kind for proper disposal of e-waste. E-waste comprising EEEs will be collected from homes by collection officers. Public collection centres will be opened for people to deposit their e-waste while pick-up trucks will be deployed for big establishments across major cities like Mumbai, New Delhi, Kolkata, Chennai, Bengaluru, Pune and Hyderabad.

Also Read: E-Waste On The Rise: India Is Now One Of The Top Five E-Waste Producers In The World: Report

NDTV – Dettol Banega Swachh India campaign lends support to the Government of India’s Swachh Bharat Mission (SBM). Helmed by Campaign Ambassador Amitabh Bachchan, the campaign aims to spread awareness about hygiene and sanitation, the importance of building toilets and making India open defecation free (ODF) by October 2019, a target set by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, when he launched Swachh Bharat Abhiyan in 2014. Over the years, the campaign has widened its scope to cover issues like air pollutionwaste managementplastic banmanual scavenging and menstrual hygiene. The campaign has also focused extensively on marine pollutionclean Ganga Project and rejuvenation of Yamuna, two of India’s major river bodies

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