NDTV-Dettol Banega Swasth Swachh India NDTV-Dettol Banega Swasth Swachh India
  • Home/
  • News/
  • Schizophrenia May Increase Risk Of Alzheimer By 2.5 Times: Study

News

Schizophrenia May Increase Risk Of Alzheimer By 2.5 Times: Study

The new systematic review and meta-analysis, published in Psychological Medicine, found that psychotic disorders may have a stronger link with dementia than other mental health disorders like depression or anxiety

Schizophrenia May Increase Risk Of Alzheimer By 2.5 Times: Study
The researchers pulled together evidence from 11 studies from nine countries on four continents, which included close to 13 million participants in total

Washington: People with psychotic diseases, such as schizophrenia, are 2.5 times more likely to develop memory loss than those who do not have a psychotic disorder, according to a study. The new systematic review and meta-analysis, published in Psychological Medicine, found that psychotic disorders may have a stronger link with dementia than other mental health disorders like depression or anxiety. Senior author Dr Jean Stafford (MRC Unit for Lifelong Health & Ageing at UCL) said:

We found that having a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder is linked to a much higher risk of developing dementia later in life. Our findings add to evidence that protecting people’s mental health throughout life could help to prevent dementia.

Also Read: Challenge Of Ensuring Mental Health For People With Disabilities

The study is the first high-quality systematic review looking at a range of psychotic disorders and their association with dementia risk. Schizophrenia and other related psychotic disorders are severe illnesses that involve symptoms such as hallucinations and delusions, and social withdrawal. Many people also experience impairments in cognitive and functional skills.

The researchers pulled together evidence from 11 studies from nine countries on four continents, which included close to 13 million participants in total.

They found that across multiple different psychotic disorders, and regardless of the age at which someone first developed their mental illness, there was a higher risk of dementia later in life. Some studies included people diagnosed with psychotic disorders while young adults, with follow-up periods of multiple decades. They also found that people who have had a psychotic disorder tend to be younger than average at dementia diagnosis, with two studies finding that people with psychotic disorders were much more likely to be diagnosed with dementia while still in their 60s.

Also Read: ‘Sitar For Mental Health’: Rishab Rikhiram Sharma, One Of India’s Youngest Sitarist, Offers His Music As Aid For People

The findings add to the list of modifiable risk factors for dementia. UCL researchers have previously found that four in 10 dementia cases could be prevented or delayed by targeting risk factors from across the lifespan. The current study’s joint senior author, Dr Vasiliki Orgeta (UCL Psychiatry), previously found that PTSD increases the likelihood of dementia, and while depression and anxiety also increase the risk, these latest findings suggest that psychotic disorders have the strongest association with dementia risk.

The researchers were not able to confirm the cause of the association, whether it is due to the mental illness itself, or perhaps because psychotic disorders increase the likelihood of conditions that in turn increase the risk of dementia. Some of the association may be because psychotic symptoms could be early markers of dementia for some people, but the fact that some of the studies had very long follow-up periods and included people experiencing psychosis at young ages suggests this is not the only explanation.

Also Read: World Mental Health Day 2022: Making Mental Health And Well-Being For All A Global Priority

Dr Orgeta said:

People with psychotic disorders are more likely to have other health conditions such as cardiovascular disease or obesity, which can increase the risk of dementia, while they are also more likely to have a poor diet, smoke or use drugs, which may harm their health in ways that could increase their likelihood of developing dementia.

Lead author Sara El Miniawi (UCL Psychiatry), who completed the research as her MSc dissertation, said:

Cognitive impairment and hallucinations can be symptoms of both dementia and psychotic disorders, so it is possible there could be a link between the two illnesses. This impairment could also limit people’s cognitive reserve, and increase their vulnerability to dementia symptoms.

Also Read: WHO Southeast Asia Committee Adopts Paro Declaration To Boost Mental Health Services

The researchers were not able to determine whether effective treatment for psychotic disorders could mitigate the dementia risk, or whether antipsychotic medication could be a factor, as there was limited and conflicting evidence.

Sara El Miniawi added:

As people with psychotic disorders face a higher risk of numerous other health conditions, managing their overall physical and mental health is very important, and here we found that health professionals working with them should also be watchful for any signs of cognitive decline.

Also Read: NCERT Issues Guidelines To Schools For Early Identification Of Mental Health Problems In Students

(This story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

NDTV – Dettol have been working towards a clean and healthy India since 2014 via the Banega Swachh India initiative, which is helmed by Campaign Ambassador Amitabh Bachchan. The campaign aims to highlight the inter-dependency of humans and the environment, and of humans on one another with the focus on One Health, One Planet, One Future – Leaving No One Behind. It stresses on the need to take care of, and consider, everyone’s health in India – especially vulnerable communities – the LGBTQ population, indigenous people, India’s different tribes, ethnic and linguistic minorities, people with disabilities, migrants, geographically remote populations, gender and sexual minorities. In wake of the current COVID-19 pandemic, the need for WASH (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene) is reaffirmed as handwashing is one of the ways to prevent Coronavirus infection and other diseases. The campaign will continue to raise awareness on the same along with focussing on the importance of nutrition and healthcare for women and children, fight malnutrition, mental wellbeing, self care, science and health, adolescent health & gender awareness. Along with the health of people, the campaign has realised the need to also take care of the health of the eco-system. Our environment is fragile due to human activity, which is not only over-exploiting available resources, but also generating immense pollution as a result of using and extracting those resources. The imbalance has also led to immense biodiversity loss that has caused one of the biggest threats to human survival – climate change. It has now been described as a “code red for humanity.” The campaign will continue to cover issues like air pollution, waste management, plastic ban, manual scavenging and sanitation workers and menstrual hygiene. Banega Swasth India will also be taking forward the dream of Swasth Bharat, the campaign feels that only a Swachh or clean India where toilets are used and open defecation free (ODF) status achieved as part of the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan launched by Prime Minister Narendra Modi in 2014, can eradicate diseases like diahorrea and the country can become a Swasth or healthy India.

Highlights: Banega Swasth India Launches Season 10

Reckitt’s Commitment To A Better Future

India’s Unsung Heroes

Women’s Health

हिंदी में पढ़ें

This website follows the DNPA Code of Ethics

© Copyright NDTV Convergence Limited 2024. All rights reserved.