Connect with us

News

United Nations Warns World Set For 2.7°C Rise On Today’s Emissions Pledges

As extreme weather events from wildfires to floods have hit countries around the world, a U.N. report in August warned that global warming due to greenhouse gas emissions could breach 1.5°C in the next two decades

United Nations Warns World Set For 2.7°C Rise On Today's Emissions Pledges
Current commitments to net zero could limit warming to around 2.2C by the end of the century, said UNEP forecast in its last report
Highlights
  • UN data shows that 143 countries account for around 57% of global emissions
  • 30% and 55% cut needed to limit warming to 2°C and 1.5°C respectively: UNEP
  • Annual greenhouse gas emissions need to fall by extra 28 gigatonnes: UNEP

London: Current commitments to cut greenhouse gas emissions put the planet on track for an average 2.7 degrees Celsius temperature rise this century, a United Nations report said on Tuesday (October 26), in another stark warning ahead of crunch climate talks. Governments will be in the spotlight at the COP26 conference next week to meet a deadline of this year to commit to more ambitious cut pledges, in what could be the last chance to put the world on track to limiting warming to below 2C above pre-industrial levels and ideally to 1.5C (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit).

As extreme weather events from wildfires to floods have hit countries around the world, a U.N. report in August warned that global warming due to greenhouse gas emissions could breach 1.5C in the next two decades.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Monday (October 25) it was “touch and go” whether the most important round of U.N. talks since the Paris Agreement in 2015 will secure the agreements needed to tackle climate change.

Also Read:  Explainer: What Is COP26 And Why Is It So Important For Tackling Climate Change Crisis?

And the U.N. World Meteorological Organization said ahead of the two-week event that begins in Glasgow, Scotland on Sunday that greenhouse gas concentrations hit a record last year and the world is “way off track” in capping rising temperatures.

The annual “emissions gap” report by the United Nations’ Environment Programme (UNEP), which measures the gap between anticipated emissions and those consistent with limiting the temperature rise this century as agreed in the Paris accord, said updated pledges only reduce forecast 2030 emissions by an additional 7.5 per cent, compared to the previous commitments.

If continued throughout this century, this would lead to warming of 2.7C, slightly less than the 3C UNEP forecast in its last report. A 30 per cent cut is needed to limit warming to 2C and a 55 per cent cut is needed to limit to 1.5C.

It said current commitments to net zero could limit warming to around 2.2C by the end of the century, but 2030 pledges so far do not put major emitters on a clear path to this.

As a group, G20 countries, which represent 80 per cent of global emissions, are not on track to achieve their original or new 2030 pledges.

“If there is no meaningful reduction of emissions in the next decade, we will have lost forever the possibility to reach 1.5 degrees,” U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres told a press briefing.

“It is absolutely essential that all G20 countries present before Glasgow or in Glasgow (pledges) that are compatible with 1.5C,” he added.

Also Read:  43 Maharashtra Cities With Population Of 65 Million To Fight Climate Change With Commitment To “Race To Zero”

The Clock Is Ticking

Latest U.N. data shows 143 countries, accounting for around 57 per cent of global emissions, have submitted new or updated emissions cut plans ahead of COP26 and their total emissions are estimated to be around 9 per cent of 2010 levels by 2030 if implemented fully.

But if all pledges by 192 countries under the Paris Agreement are taken together, an increase of around 16 per cent in global emissions is expected by 2030 compared to 2010, which would lead to warming of around 2.7C.

China and India, which are together responsible for around 30 per cent of global emissions, have not yet made enhanced pledges.

Over the last 11 years, policies have been put in place which will lower annual emissions by 11 gigatonnes (Gt) of CO2 equivalent by 2030, compared to what would have happened without these policies, the report said.

Also Read: Implementation Of SDGs Needs Efforts Of Society As A Whole: India’s Permanent Representative To UN

However, fossil fuel production is not slowing at the rate needed, with major economies set to produce more than double the amount of coal, oil and gas in 2030 than is consistent with meeting climate goals.

“On current progress, we’ll close the 2030 emissions gap sometime in the 2080s,” Myles Allen, professor of geosystem science at the University of Oxford, who was not involved in the report, said.

By 2030, to reach the 1.5C limit, annual greenhouse gas emissions need to fall by an extra 28 Gt, or be halved from current levels of nearly 60 Gt, over and above what is promised in updated pledges and other 2030 commitments, UNEP said.

For the 2C limit, an additional 13 Gt cut in annual emissions is needed by 2030.

We have eight years to make the plans, put in place the policies, implement them and ultimately deliver the cuts, UNEP executive director Inger Andersen said.

“The clock is ticking loudly.”

Also Read: Coldplay’s ‘Music Of The Spheres’ World Tour Will Be Environment Friendly

(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)

NDTV – Dettol have been working towards a clean and healthy India since 2014 via Banega Swachh India initiative, which is helmed by Campaign Ambassador Amitabh Bachchan. The campaign aims to highlight the inter-dependency of humans and the environment, and of humans on one another with the focus on One Health, One Planet, One Future – Leaving No One Behind. It stresses on the need to take care of, and consider, everyone’s health in India – especially vulnerable communities – the LGBTQ populationindigenous people, India’s different tribes, ethnic and linguistic minorities, people with disabilities, migrants, geographically remote populations, gender and sexual minorities. In wake of the current COVID-19 pandemic, the need for WASH (WaterSanitation and Hygiene) is reaffirmed as handwashing is one of the ways to prevent Coronavirus infection and other diseases. The campaign will continue to raise awareness on the same along with focussing on the importance of nutrition and healthcare for women and children, fight malnutrition, mental wellbeing, self care, science and health, adolescent health & gender awareness. Along with the health of people, the campaign has realised the need to also take care of the health of the eco-system. Our environment is fragile due to human activity,  that is not only over-exploiting available resources, but also generating immense pollution as a result of using and extracting those resources. The imbalance has also led to immense biodiversity loss that has caused one of the biggest threats to human survival – climate change. It has now been described as a “code red for humanity.” The campaign will continue to cover issues like air pollutionwaste managementplastic banmanual scavenging and sanitation workers and menstrual hygiene. Banega Swasth India will also be taking forward the dream of Swasth Bharat, the campaign feels that only a Swachh or clean India where toilets are used and open defecation free (ODF) status achieved as part of the Swachh Bharat Abhiyan launched by Prime Minister Narendra Modi in 2014, can eradicate diseases like diahorrea and the country can become a Swasth or healthy India.

Folk Music For A Swasth India

RajasthanDay” src=

Reckitt’s Commitment To A Better Future

Expert Blog

हिंदी में पड़े

Latest Posts