Global Waste Could Grow By 70 Percent By 2050 As Cities Boom, Warns World Bank

Global Waste Could Grow By 70 Percent By 2050 As Cities Boom, Warns World Bank

With an increase in urbanization and size of population, the world, especially the South Asian and Sub-Saharan African countries are set to produce the biggest proportion of the global waste which may grow by 70 per cent by 2050, says a World Bank Report
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Global Waste Management: World Waste Could Grow 70 Percent As Cities Boom, Warns World BankIf not checked now, the amount of rubbish will grow to 3.4 billion tons by 2050

Mexico: Global waste could grow by 70 per cent by 2050 as urbanisation and populations rise, said the World Bank on Thursday, with South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa set to generate the biggest increase in rubbish. Countries could reap economic and environmental benefits by better collecting, recycling and disposing of trash, according to a report, which calculated that a third of the world’s waste is instead dumped openly, with no treatment. “We really need to pay attention to South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, as by 2050, South Asia’s waste will double, sub-Saharan Africa’s waste will triple,” said Silpa Kaza, World Bank urban development specialist and report lead author.

Also Read: Solid Waste In Himachal’s Industrial Hub, Baddi, Is Potential Health Hazard: Environmental Watchdog

If we don’t take any action it could have quite significant implications for health, productivity, environment, livelihoods, she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

According to the report, the rise in rubbish will outstrip population growth, reaching 3.4 billion tons by 2050 from around 2 billion tons in 2016. High-income countries produce a third of the world’s waste, despite having only 16 percent of world’s population, while a quarter comes from East Asia and the Pacific regions, it said.

Also Read: Supreme Court Says Delhi Under ‘Mountains Of Garbage’, Slams Lieutenant Governor For Inaction

While more than a third of waste globally ends up in landfill, over 90 percent is dumped openly in lower income countries that often lack adequate disposal and treatment facilities, said the report. A booming waste burden could also contribute to climate change impact, with the treatment and disposal of current waste levels generating around 5 percent of carbon emissions. Adequate financing for collection and disposal is one of the biggest issues for cities that often struggle to cover the costs of providing waste services, said Ms. Kaza.

Also Read: Noida Authority Complies To NGT Order, Begins Work To Remove Landfill Site From Sector 54

If the incentives are aligned and there’s ability for contracts to be enforced, then the private sector can be a really powerful player, she said.

Boosting recycling and cutting plastics consumption along with food waste could help reduce rubbish, said the report, which noted a number of low income countries lack laws to deal with waste. Plastics, which can contaminate waterways and ecosystems for thousands of years, comprise 12 percent of all waste, the World Bank said. “Unfortunately, it is often the poorest in society who are adversely impacted by inadequate waste management,” Laura Tuck, World Bank sustainable development vice president, said in a statement. “It doesn’t have to be this way. Our resources need to be used and then reused continuously so that they don’t end up in landfills”, he added.

Also Read: Despite New Waste Management Rules, Delhi’s Ghazipur Landfill Grows 15 Metres In A Year

NDTV – Dettol Banega Swachh India campaign lends support to the Government of India’s Swachh Bharat Mission (SBM). Helmed by Campaign Ambassador Amitabh Bachchan, the campaign aims to spread awareness about hygiene and sanitation, the importance of building toilets and making India open defecation free (ODF) by October 2019, a target set by Prime Minister Narendra Modi, when he launched Swachh Bharat Abhiyan in 2014. Over the years, the campaign has widened its scope to cover issues like air pollutionwaste managementplastic banmanual scavenging and menstrual hygiene. The campaign has also focused extensively on marine pollutionclean Ganga Project and rejuvenation of Yamuna, two of India’s major river bodies.

© Thomson Reuters 2018

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